Advertisement

Corrigendum to “Does Late-life Depression Accelerate Aging?” [Am J Geriatr Psychiatry 31 (2023) 10–13]

Published:January 05, 2023DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jagp.2023.01.001
      The editor regrets that the printed version of the above editorial commentary in the January, 2023 edition of AJGP, contained several errors. The correct and final version of the editorial commentary appears in this issue. It offers a clear and robust discussion of the interface between geroscience and geriatric mental health and of the importance and innovation of the finding presented in the original research article.

      Linked Article

      • Does Late-Life Depression Accelerate Aging?
        The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
        • Preview
          Depression in older adults occurs in the context of biological aging that contributes to the clinical symptoms, biomarkers, and the course of the disease.1 Neurobiology of aging and late-life mental disorders share features of increased cellular senescence, inflammation, and reduced mitochondrial function. In addition, serious mental disorders (SMDs), including major depression, are associated with an increased risk of medical illnesses and premature mortality from natural causes, with lifespans up to 25 years shorter than the general population, even after controlling for suicide.
        • Full-Text
        • PDF
      • Does Late-Life Depression Accelerate Aging?
        The American Journal of Geriatric PsychiatryVol. 31Issue 1
        • Preview
          Depression in older adults occurs in the context of biological aging that contributes to the clinical symptoms, biomarkers, and the course of the disease.1 Neurobiology of aging and late-life mental disorders share features of increased cellular senescence, inflammation, and reduced mitochondrial function. In addition, serious mental disorders (SMDs), including major depression, are associated with an increased risk of medical illnesses and premature mortality from natural causes, with lifespans up to 25 years shorter than the general population, even after controlling for suicide.
        • Full-Text
        • PDF